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  • Writer's pictureElliot Leigh

Should your property have an EPC?


Should your property have an EPC?

To put it simply, if your property has a roof and walls, it will need an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC). EPC regulations in the UK have been implemented to promote energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions. In this blog, we will discuss what EPCs are, how they work, and why they are important.


What is an EPC?


An EPC is a document that shows the energy efficiency rating of a building, ranging from A (most efficient) to G (least efficient). It also includes recommendations on how to improve the energy efficiency of the building.


How do EPCs work?


EPCs are produced by accredited energy assessors who inspect the building and collect data on its construction, heating, lighting, and insulation. They use this data to calculate the building's energy efficiency rating and make recommendations on how to improve it.

EPCs are required when a property is built, sold or rented out. The certificate is valid for 10 years and must be made available to prospective buyers or tenants.


Why are EPCs important?


EPCs are important because they help to reduce carbon emissions and energy consumption. Buildings are responsible for around 40% of the UK's total energy consumption and carbon emissions, and improving their energy efficiency is essential for meeting the UK's climate change targets.


EPCs also provide valuable information for property buyers and tenants, allowing them to compare the energy efficiency of different properties and make informed decisions about where to live or work.


EPC Regulations in the UK


The Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations 2012 require that an EPC is obtained for all non-domestic buildings when they are constructed, sold, or let. The regulations apply to both public and private sector buildings and aim to improve the energy efficiency of the UK's building stock.


The regulations require that the EPC is displayed prominently in the building, and that it is made available to prospective buyers or tenants. Failure to comply with the regulations can result in fines of up to £5,000 for non-compliance.


Conclusion


EPCs are an important tool for improving the energy efficiency of buildings and reducing carbon emissions. They provide valuable information for property buyers and tenants and are a legal requirement for non-domestic buildings in the UK. By improving the energy efficiency of our buildings, we can help to meet the UK's climate change targets and create a more sustainable future.


If you need any advice on EPCs, get in touch with us today.


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